Substitutions

Butter – if I’m greasing a pan with it, I sometimes use

  • cooking spray
  • butter flavored cooking spray if I want the flavor
  • a papertowel dipped in oil and swabbed on the pan for low-cal low fat alternative

          – if I’m sauteeing with it

  • olive oil if I don’t mind that flavor in the dish – more fat by weight but unsaturated and less required.  It also has a higher smoke point
  • vegetable oil if I don’t want extra flavor in a dish- more fat by weight but unsaturated and less required. It also has a higher smoke point.
  • a mixture of butter and oil, all the flavor with less saturated fats with a higher smoke point
  • a papertowel dipped in oil and swabbed on the pan for low-cal low fat alternative

           -if baking with butter here’s some ways to cut

  • Simply cut the butter in a recipe in half – it will change the texture, but generally work.  Do not cut more than half!
  • Yogurt can sometimes substitute for a small portion of the butter
  • I’ve heard applesauce.  When I try that, I am always dissatisfied with the results.  Prove me wrong.  Send me a recipe that works with it.

            -if spreading it on delicious bread

  • Do not substitute.  There is just as much fat in margine.  There is a worse, more artery-clogging kind of fat in most margarines.  It’s called partially hydrogenated, i.e. transfat.  Check the back of your package.  It can say 0 trans fat on the front and still legally have hydrogenated fats in it (thanks FDA).  Any hydrogenated fats are artery-clogging transfats, even if they is a low enough amount per serving to be labeled 0 by the FDA. Avoid. Avoid.  Plus, once you get used to the taste of real butter, you’ll never go back.  Just be moderate.
  • If you truly dig on that faux buttery flavor (as I once did), then get Earth Balance.  They truly have no hydrogenated fats. 

Cooking Spray

  • when I don’t have any, I use a papertowel dipped in oil and swabbed on the pan for that low-cal low fat work around for butter or full on oil.

Cream

  • in a baking recipe, buttermilk or even yogurt
  • In cooking, whole milk or even 2% depending on what’s in the fridge
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